f22 macro test Nikon D3100 w TAMRON SP 90mm F2.5 flat field manual focus lens

Back in 2011, I had a small macro project to shoot and found the kit lens for the D3100 wasn’t quite the right tool. I switched to my Sony H50 and took the shots with a tripod. Final edit was basically cropping down to the center of the full image to the item of interest but really only using less than ten per cent of the frame.

More of this work is coming and I was musing about a new lens when my brain cells caught fire and I remembered my long ago purchased new Tamron SP 90mm f2.5 flat field telemacro lens with Adaptall 2 mount. I ended up buying Pentax K and Nikon AI mounts for it and had good results.

The Nikon D3100 and this lens can only be used in manual mode, so a little trial and error is necessary to get the exposure right.

The Canadian dime is the same size as an American dime.

tripod used
full frame is shown
lens to subject distance is minimum focusing distance of the lens
f22 aperture used

entertainment technology and the dialysis patient experience and that Windows 8.1 upgrade such a long time

I love technology but now and then the romance gets a little difficult

I was surprised at how long it took to up from Win 8.0 on a laptop and a desktop. By far the longest version upgrade of PC software I have ever experienced and I have been doing this awhile.  I did personal computing before Windows 3.0.

Zahnkranzpakete

Zahnkranzpakete (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Certainly Windows 8 is an interesting and enjoyable interface.  The upgrades went fine.  So far, so good, knock wood.

For convenience, especially at Dialysis, I carry an iPad2, was reading my Sony Ereader books on it this week. I just wish the tablets had 250gb of storage, not 16. Hard to carry a decent load of digital TV shows or movies with just 16gb for copies from my iTunes selections.

With four hours in the dialysis chair with very modest sized desklet wings on the chair, I find a laptop can be too heavy in the lap for that amount of time.  Those little desk flaps can be locked up or released and dropped down. The chairs are old and sometimes the wings drop on their own.  A poor bet with a laptop and its weight. There are numerous power plugs near to the dialysis chair and so I can plug in easily and not have to rely on the battery power.

GE electric fan from early 20th century.

GE electric fan from early 20th century. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Then there is the cooling issue with the vents on the bottom surface of the laptop.  I drag with me a very light lap desk with raised grooves on one side to allow the laptop vents to breathe.  Works okay.

Sometimes the nurses growl mildly at all the crap I bring with me to dialysis including the computerish stuff and paper on a clipboard, pens and a couple of “paper” books for reading.  They have learned to give me a moment or two extra to “nest.” I guess I am terrified of being bored out of my mind for four hours.  Many days a moment arrives in dialysis where I have to talk myself out of screaming, tearing myself free and running out of the place Patience has never been a strong suit in my life.  Perhaps I never had it early on because I somehow knew I was going to need boatloads of it to get through dialysis and all the ancillary moments of extreme unction it bring with it.

By and large dialysis patients seem to handle it surprisingly well but then if you ask the right innocent question, that facade dissolves instantly and a snarling, bitter reply stings out when they let loose how they really feel. I guess we hide a lot of that from nurses and doctors.

The dialysis unit provides a television for each patient on a huge telescoping, spring mounted arm.  I used to watch TCM and its brilliant vintage movie programming.  Then the hospital administration figured out how to save some dollars by skinnying down the cable contract and we lost some 15 channels. The patients are expecting some day soon to be asked to pay a charge per day for TV service but it has not happened yet.

The TVs are 12 inch screen CRT old picture tube sets.  The major trouble with them is the earphone input.  On a few of them you need to monkey with your audio jack to get sound of them.  Sometimes we need to ask the nurse for a small piece of tape to get it to stay in the perfect position to keep getting sound of the TV.  The hospital clinic provides free headphones, bought at the Dollar Store. I prefer my own ear buds.

Looking Back ~ Philco Predicta Television, 1958

Looking Back ~ Philco Predicta Television, 1958 (Photo credit: e r j k p r u n c z y k)

I don’t know where they get replacements.  I doubt they still make these. I know these picture tubes are environmentally nasty with a ton of lead in their glass.  The hospital is probably sourcing refurbished units of this kind of TV.  We all look forward to new flat screen midget TVs some day.  I find that TV programming in the mornings has little on offer to interest me.

Although lately the reality TV aspects of the Senate of Canada scandals and the Rob Ford slow pirouette of self-destruction are quite interesting in a can’t turn away from the car crash kind of way.

Tonight at home on the sun porch with the pitch black scene of Georgian Bay outside I am watching 1986 movie Quicksilver with Kevin Bacon, Lawrennce Fishburne, Paul Rodriguez.  A bike messenger movie with no cell phones in NYC. My God how things have changed.

A slightly trimmer Louis Anderson is in it as well as the heftier model bike messenger.  Jamie Gertz plays the love interest.  They all look like babies.

Time Lost and Cable Found

JUST SPENT AN HOUR hunting down the USB to mini-USB cable that allows me to power up my iPad bluetooth case/keyboard from Targus.  Found many, many cables tucked in various containers and boxes.  Quite the gamut, RCA phono plugs, ethernet, various proprietary digital camera cables, etc. Sigh,  I only now and then label my cables.

So be it resolved, a cold rainy day project for me is to go through the mounds of old cables and connectors and ditch the paleo-IT stuff.

 Organization is the close cousin of procrastination, I will do it, eventually.  When I grow up I want to be highly organized.